Madagascar

Temp.

Madagascar / Sambava: Scattered clouds

Autres épices

Madagascar produces a variety of spices, including gastronomic qualities, are demonstrated.

Malagasy people do not use spices as much as Asian in its dishes. Only a small proportion of the population uses cloves, vanilla, pink pepper, and even pepper and cinnamon. On the other hand, chili, ginger, turmeric, onions, garlic, are part of the culinary heritage of Madagascar. For these products, it's hard to compete with, if not impossible, the domestic market

Few spices typical of Madagascar still struggling to make themselves known on the market, because of their rarity and preservation:

  • voatsiperifery, (piper bourbonense),which is the family Piperaceae. 
    o It is used to season food by its subtle flavor and its relatively strong taste. 

    o It often enters into the composition of spiced pasta  with ginger and lemon. 

  • Havozo , (ravensara aromatica), family Lauraceae. This is exploited in two ways:
    o its bark, which smells like anise, rich in methyl-chavicol, is sold to the market by herbalists.
    o light brown color, it is coarser and thicker than the bark of cinnamon.
    o It is used in traditional medicine and as a condiment in some recipes.
    o It is also used to flavor rum and some pastries (powder)
    o leaves give an essential oil (it feels less anise) different from that of the bark (consisting of 90% methyl-chavicol)
     
These two plants are subject to a protective measure, because of their rarefaction.
Trimeta AGRO FOOD exports the black pepper, cinnamon (in pipe and chip), and pink pepper.

 

 

 

 

 

The plant

In Madagascar, two plants are entitled to the name "pepper" from the family of Piperaceae.

- The voantsiperifery, piper borbonense is endemic and genuinely native to the Big Island. It is a wild plant that is found in primary forests of the eastern part of the Plateau and the eastern side of the cliffs. The creeper can reach 20m long; the fruits are tailed berries of smaller dimension than ordinary pepper. It exudes a subtle spicy aroma and soft (different from the pepper.). It has a pungent and sweet taste (unfortunately it becomes bitter after a long cooking or high temperature). No study or culture test has been done on this plant.

- Pepper, piper nigrum L., which was introduced to Madagascar in the early 20th century by settlers from a strain imported from Siam.

It is a creeper that clings to a living or dead tutor, through small roots at each node, which also participate in nutrition. It can reach a few tens of meters in length.

The leaves are persistent and heart-shaped, the size of a hand.

The flowers are white, clustered around a stem.

The fruits are small green berries at first, to take a dark red at maturity.

Only fruits are exploited when green in brine, or mature, sun-dried to give the black pepper. Dried fruit, black is rubbed to remove its pericarp to give white pepper.

The cultivation

The plant was imported from Siam in the early 20th century. The cuttings were planted in experimental garden of Ivoloina, before distribution along the East Coast (regions of Vatovavy Fitovinany, Antsinanana, Analanjirofo, Atsimo-Atsinanana) and in the Diana region, Ambanja and Nosy Be.

 

The production

The yield was 350 to 1750kg / ha in Madagascar.

It exports between 1500 and 2000T / year.

This amount represents only 0.5% of global demand (according MINAGRI).

Despite its recognized qualities, the available quantity does not make a reference to the international market.

Uses

Pepper is a spice most used in the world:

- In the kitchen:

o Condiment aromatic and spicy

o Preserves and jams

o Delicatessen

o Dishes prepared

o Grog

- Medicinal Properties

o Promotes digestion and reduces flatulence

o Aphrodisiac

o Prevents some cancers

o antidepressant

o Antimicrobial and anti-infective

o decongestant and antipyretic (cough, flu)

o Anti-inflammatory (arthritis)

o antispasmodic and anti colic

- Perfumery and Cosmetics

o Fine Fragrances

- Protection

o Bomb tear

Essential oils

- Essential oil of green pepper from the distillation of immature fruits

- Black Pepper essential oil, obtained by distillation of dry mature fruit. Yield: 2 to 2.5%. Trimeta Agro Food has a capacity of 300kg per month.

Plant

In Madagascar, there are only two varieties of cinnamommum sp., which are:

- The cinnamommum camphora known in the market for its essential oil, Ravintsara oil

- The cinnamommum zeylanicum, cinnamon, which is operated primarily for the bark and leaves, incidentally, for its essential oil

It is a tree of the Lauraceae family, whose height reached 15m.

The leaves are evergreen, oblong, bright green, 8 to 15cm long.

The flowers are tiny, greenish white, producing a sweet and pleasant odor.

The fruits are berries about 1cm in diameter, purple colors.

Cultivation

We do not lay exactly how or at what time this plant, native to Sri Lanka, was introduced to Madagascar. During the colonial era, plantations were established in Atsimo-Antsinanana, Vatovavy Fitovinany and Antsinanana regions, but it has spread spontaneously throughout the east coast of Madagascar.

Districts of Vatomandry and Mahanoro (Antsinanana region), are currently the main production areas.

The bark is harvested throughout the year, but especially in March and April. The exploitation of a seedling is 5 years after planting.

Cinnamon Madagascar was one of the best qualities of the global market. Unfortunately, farmers are disinterested in this plant for the benefit of another speculations.

Production

Production of Cinnamon from Madagascar would be around 2000T / year. It exports around 1000 to 1500t cinnamon, in various forms, but especially in pipe, broken and powder. Trimeta Agro Food exports it to India, the USA and Europe.

Uses

Cooking recipe:

- Widely used in oriental cuisines

- Cinnamon goes well with both sweet and savory preparations

- Aromatic Condiment (combines well with chocolate or apple, for example)

- Component of curry

- Preparations containing alcohol (liquor, punch, etc ...)

- Teas and infusions base

Medicinal Properties:

- Stimulates digestion and respiration

- Antiseptic,

- Antispasmodic

- Anti fungal powerful

- Pest

- Influenza

- Anti glucose (it stabilizes type 2 Diabetes)

- Antioxidant and anti-stress

Industrial use:

- Leather tanning (powder)

- Fine Fragrance (Essential Oil bark)

- Fractionation of Eugenol (Essential Oil of the leaves)

- Cosmetics

- Dentistry (toothpaste and mouthwash)

Essential oils:

- Essential oil of cinnamon bark (consisting mainly of cinnamaldehyde more than 50%) for fine perfumery.

- Essential Oil Cinnamon Leaf (composed of 80% Eugenol) for the chemical industry.

The plant

Pink pepper, schinus terbenthifolius, a plant family Anacardiaceae, is a native of Brazil. It was introduced to Madagascar by the waves of immigration of French settlers during the 20th century, and was surveyed for the first time in 1964, as part of the flora of Madagascar, by PZBT (Tsimbazaza's Zoological and Botanical Park). No common name is assigned.

It is well suited in several regions of Madagascar (Analamanga, Mania, Matsiatra, Eastern, and Bongolava Anosy). It has the scent of pepper releasing its fruit and leaves. It is a plant that can become a tree of 15m tall and 60cm in diameter trunk. In cultivation, it must be regularly trimmed and folded for easy operation and maintenance.

The imparipinnate leaves are persistent. They give off, when wrinkled, pronounced peppery scent, mixed with a subtle smell of turpentine.

The small white flowers give a subtly flavored honey. Flowering takes place from February to April. In Bongolava region, it was observed that it also happens in September and October.

The fruits are berries (the size of pepper) cluster which, when mature, have a scarlet red. The pericarp contains a pulp slightly sweet taste, surrounding the seed (size of a lens). The pulp has a peppery aniseed discreetly scent.

Finally, the plant also provides a fragrant gum used as incense.

The Pink pepper was primarily known in Madagascar as an ornamental plant and economic interest has been recognized that in the early 1990s.

Marketing

TRIMETA AGROFOOD works since 2004 to develop, with Producers Group, the plantation of Pink Pepper, schinus terbenthifolius, in the Bongolava region, Middle West of Madagascar. The Company provides, among other things, advice on plantations, the popularization of culture to the village associations, and supports the marketing of products, while guaranteeing a fixed price with the producer groups.

TRIMETA AGROFOOD carries the product, collected in the Bongolava, to its facilities in Tamatave, where it is treated to meet the requirements of importing customers and international phytosanitary standards. Production undergoes sorting treatment, graduation, heat disinfection, and it is packaged in PP bag of 2 kg net, and then packed in cartons of 10 kg net each. The product is then ready for export.

Note that no chemicals are used, from growing in the fields until the end of the packaging of production for exporting.

“TRIMETA AGROFOOD” exports this product to Japan, Canada and Europe.

The derivatives of pink pepper

In addition to the marketing of fruit, Pink pepper  also provides two types of essential oils, including:

-  Essential oil of the leaves (0.4% to 0.75% yield)

-  Essential oil of berries (2.5% to 4% yield)

SPECIFICATION

PINK PEPPER CORN

(schinus terebinthifolius.)

HARVESTING PERIOD APRIL TO AUGUST

PINK PEPPER CORN Grade 1:

Colour: Scarlet Red, Uniform Colour

No foreign materials, free of insect

Free of stones and metals

broken bay : less than 1%

Moisture: less than 12%

Packed: in sachets of 2 kg net

10 kg net in one carton

Price: on request

Minimum order: 100 kg

Payment terms: CAD through bank, against the original documents, payment on first presentation

SHIPMENT : BY AIR

 

Other spices

Madagascar produces a variety of spices, including gastronomic qualities, are demonstrated.

Malagasy people do not use spices as much as Asian in its dishes. Only a small proportion of the population uses cloves, vanilla, pink pepper, and even pepper and cinnamon. On the other hand, chili, ginger, turmeric, onions, garlic, are part of the culinary heritage of Madagascar. For these products, it's hard to compete with, if not impossible, the domestic market

Few spices typical of Madagascar still struggling to make themselves known on the market, because of their rarity and preservation:

  • voatsiperifery, (piper bourbonense),which is the family Piperaceae. 
    o It is used to season food by its subtle flavor and its relatively strong taste. 

    o It often enters into the composition of spiced pasta  with ginger and lemon. 

  • Havozo , (ravensara aromatica), family Lauraceae. This is exploited in two ways:
    o its bark, which smells like anise, rich in methyl-chavicol, is sold to the market by herbalists.
    o light brown color, it is coarser and thicker than the bark of cinnamon.
    o It is used in traditional medicine and as a condiment in some recipes.
    o It is also used to flavor rum and some pastries (powder)
    o leaves give an essential oil (it feels less anise) different from that of the bark (consisting of 90% methyl-chavicol)
     
These two plants are subject to a protective measure, because of their rarefaction.
Trimeta AGRO FOOD exports the black pepper, cinnamon (in pipe and chip), and pink pepper.

 

 

 

 

 

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